Tourist Pine to Fly Drones in Antarctica? Weird!

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The International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators is cautioning all potential travelers to Antarctica who pine to fly a drone to check with their travel agent or tour operator before packing their device.  – The Washington Times

Tourists are pining to fly drones in Antarctica? What kind of tourist pines to fly drones in Antarctica? The bigger question is who uses the word pining anymore?

Is IE on its Last Legs?

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Tidings of a new browser coming from Microsoft have some wondering whether IE is on its last legs. The sad news is that there are still so many old versions (7, 8 and 9)  sitting on millions of computers, and their users don’t know any better. So even if Spartan, or its children, eventually displace Internet Explorer, front-end developers will be playing patty cake with old versions for years to come.

It’s interesting that Microsoft is coming out with a brand new browser when IE11 has so many improvements and seems much less maligned than its older versions. Makes me think maybe this is just the start of a rebranding effort.

 

Further Reading:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2863746/what-microsofts-fresh-start-browser-strategy-means.html

Map your business

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Believe it or not, maps aren’t magical. They don’t just happen. Online mapping companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple and MapQuest get data on their maps through good old fashioned research. But there is a limit to the amount of information they are willing to collect and display by default.

Fortunately, if you’re a business owner you can help make online map applications more complete while increasing your business’ exposure. The four companies mentioned above all offer free services for verified businesses to be able to update the information presented on their maps.

If you own a business you owe it to yourself to research your own map listings and update them if you don’t like what you see. Here are the links so you can get verified and start updating now:

https://www.google.com/business/

https://mapsconnect.apple.com/

https://www.bingplaces.com/

MapQuest no longer supports accessing your basic listing information through their Local Business Center. You can add your business listing to MapQuest but you can only submit limited information. In order to enhance your listing you need to upgrade to a premium account.

How to Organize Your CSS

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Organizing my css styles does not come easily. I like to just throw styles on the page when I need them and then forget about them. If I need to edit the style I can always use a Find or Search function for the id, class or tag name I need.

If you are the only one working on your project you might be able to get away with just using the search function in your IDE. You probably know (generally) where things are because you put them there. But organization is still important.

The real power of organization comes when other people use and modify your css. If anyone other than yourself is going to even look at your stylesheet you have to make if accessible.

There might be a hundred ways to put your stylesheet together in a logical, readable way. Here is one way that works for me:

1. It goes without saying to get your style definitions out of your html document. Putting your styles in a <style> tag really only works for an extremely small project that will never grow. If you want to scale your project, having your html and css in one page gets ugly. As far as inline styles, I only use them occasionally when I am dynamically generating certain elements. I never use inline styles in static html.

2. Use /**/ comments to explain and segment your external stylesheet. At the beginning of the .css file it is convenient to have a comment block that describes how the style rules are organized and the stylesheet’s relationship to other stylesheets, if there are any.

Some developers like to put common block level element (body, header, footer, p, h1 …) styles on a sheet separate from all other css. Others have separate sheets for each type of page on their site. This should be documented at the top of each css file to make style navigation easier.

A lot of my work is done for single page GIS apps so I usually have a single external css page. In these cases I note that this is the only css stylesheet for the app.

3. Everyone has their own favorite way of laying out their styleswithing the stylesheet. Some organize their ids and classes alphabetically while others might order them parallel to their element’s order in the html. I find that it makes most sense to group styles according to sections of the page. Sometimes I put css blocks in order of how the html sections are created but this isn’t always the case. Within each of these sections I try to further order elements from top to bottom as they appear in the html.

There are a lot of ways to organize css and what I outlined above is only one of them. The most important thing is just to have some form of organization and then be consistent in applying it.

Use Python to Keep Your Brain Sharp

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“Use it or lose it” certainly applies where brain function is concerned. The experts tell you to exercise your brain to keep it in shape and ward off forgetfulness and possibly dementia when you are older.

One way to exercise your brain is to do computations in your head. Not long ago I read a book called The Power of Forgetting by Mike Byster that introduced several tricks and methods for doing these mental computations. One that stuck with me was how to multiply two, two-digit numbers in your head. Here’s an excerpt from the book explaining how to do it:

addnumbersThere are probably easier ways to do mental multiplication but Byster’s method is meant to be an exercise in remembering and forgetting numbers at will to make your brain stronger.

I wanted to find a way to challenge myself with the above multiplication method on a regular basis. My solution was to write a very small Python script that would generate random two-digit by two-digit multiplication problems and display them on screen. Here is what I came up with:

from random import randint
from ctypes import windll

firstNumber = randint(10,99)
secondNumber = randint(10,99)

problem = str(firstNumber) + " x " + str(secondNumber)
answer = str(firstNumber*secondNumber)

windll.user32.MessageBoxA(0, problem, "Can you multiply these in your head?", 0)
windll.user32.MessageBoxA(0, "The answer is: " + answer, "How did you do?", 0)

The script simply generates two random two-digit numbers, displays them to the user, then displays the correct answer when the user closes the first message box. I used Python’s ctypes library to create Windows message boxes,so you would need to make some adjustments if you wanted to use it on a different operating system. I also set up my task scheduler to run the script automatically every hour. Now, throughout the day at work and at home I’m reminded to exercise my mind in a way I wouldn’t normally exercise it.