Are Linkedin Background Photos Worth the Trouble?

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With Linkedin allowing background photos for your profile you now have one more way to express yourself creatively on the platform. But Linkedin isn’t Facebook. It’s a professional network and is typically understood to have professionally presented profiles. Having a clean, flat layout with a simple blue and grayscale color scheme has helped keep Linkedin profiles in line with that strategy.

Before background photos the worst offense a user could do visually was insert Homer Simpson as their profile picture. Now we are given the power to screw up a much larger portion of our profile’s real estate.

Is it worth possibly reducing the professional look of your profile just to “express” yourself on one more social channel? Or is it worth the time and effort it will take to produce an image that will still project the professionalism that a plain background already does? The answer to both of these questions is – probably not. I doubt that a connection, employer or recruiter will give a second thought to your profile header not having some sort of graphic behind it. A good head shot as your profile picture will, however, still be expected.

But that doesn’t mean that you absolutely shouldn’t use a background photo. If an image is well thought-out and conveys important information upfront to someone viewing your profile, it could be very worthwhile. Putting in a picture of balloons, sunsets or your dog will probably only serve to distract viewers. However, a picture of you speaking at an event gives the impression that you’re an expert in your field and have experience with public speaking. Likewise, a picture of a map might strengthen the profile of a cartographer or GIS professional.

When someone views your profile, your title and profile picture are usually the first things they see. As we all know, first impressions can make a real impact. If you can influence that first impression positively, then the extra profile eye-candy could be an asset.

I’m still on the fence about whether to put a background photo on my own Linkedin profile page. At this point in time I think Linkedin background photos are a bit of a risk for both Linkedin and its users. While profile customization can make your page look nice, it also runs the risk of making it look like a wannabe Facebook page. That’s not in keeping with the feel of Linkedin. If you do decide to add a background photo, keep it simple and above all, relevant to the rest of your profile.

C is for Crash

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There are those moments when you realize that certain sports just aren’t worth it. I spotted this encouraging sign in a pile of old junk while hiking a local ski resort in the off season. It does encourage me not to crash but mostly by convincing me not to take up skiing.

Cookie Monster with Broken Arm

 

I wonder how long it took for someone to realize that instilling terror in your patrons isn’t a good marketing ploy.

 

Installing Setuptools and PIP for Python

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Python logoI’ve installed a lot of Python packages over the years using Distutils, SetupTools/easy_install and PIP. Distutils is Python’s built-in package distribution module and is pretty easy to use. However, it has some limitations, primarily that you have to manually download the package dependencies and there is no method to uninstall packages.

The Setuptools easy_install script takes care of downloading packages and package dependencies but still lacks certain features you would want from a fully functioning package manager. It doesn’t provide version control support, package tracking and uninstallation. There is a lot more to the Python package discussion but there is no point in bringing it up.

Anyway, while I use package distribution tools I rarely have to install the tools themselves since they only get loaded once. When I do have to set up a new machine or upgrade someone elses, I always forget the steps to get Setuptools and PIP installed. So I thought I would document the steps here. Now I just have to remember to come back here when I need them.

 Installing Setuptools:

1. Right click on this ez_setup.py link and save the file to your Python Scripts folder (If you have ArcGIS loaded you will usually find this at C:\Python27\ArcGIS10.x\Scripts).

2. Open a command prompt and change into the SCRIPTS directory.

3. Type

python ez_setup.py

then hit enter to execute the code. This will run the script which will download and install setuptools on your system.

For the official installation instructions for setuptools, which includes instructions for installing on Windows 8 with Powershell visit https://pypi.python.org/pypi/setuptools.

Installing PIP:

1. Open a command prompt and change into the C:\Python27 directory.

2. Type

easy_install pip

then hit enter to execute. Pip should now be installed on your system.

To actually install a package using PIP from a command prompt you simply type

pip install "PackageName"

and everything will be taken care of for you. To explore the more than 54,000 packages that are available for Pip to load visit PyPI – the Python Package Index.

Be Different with Custom Styled Google Maps

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[iframe src=”http://ryanrandom.com/maps/GMExample.html” align=”center” width=”500″ height=”400″]
map style by Tracy Elliott on SnazzyMaps.com

If you are developing with the Google Maps JavaScript API you’re already creating custom code so you might as well go the extra mile and change the default style of your map so it doesn’t look like every other Google map out there.

Getting a unique looking map that fits well with the style of your web page is actually really very easy. The Google API gives you the option of re-styling the existing standard map types or creating new map types containing your styles. Either way, if you are comfortable with the Google Maps JavaScript API you can put a fresh face on your map in no time.

Click here to see an example of a custom Google Map style.

For detailed instructions on how to custom style your map, you can see the Styled Maps section of the Google Map JavaScript API Developer’s guide.

If you would rather use a tool to generate your code you can use the ones listed below for free. Some of them even have pre-built styles that are ready to be plugged into your code.

Styled Map Wizard

Evoluted Style Tool

MapStylr

SnazzyMaps

Google Maps Colorizr

Custom Google Maps Style Tool